Panic Attacks and Panic Disorder – Diagnosis and Treatment


treatment for panic attacks

Introduction:

A group of people sitting on a bed

Panic Attacks and Panic Disorders are often misunderstood by people who don’t suffer from them. It can be difficult for those who have never experienced a panic attack to understand what it is like to experience one. This article will attempt to give some insight into the experience of a panic attack and how it may lead to panic disorder.

The first thing that you might notice about an individual experiencing a panic attack is their breathing pattern changes or becomes more shallow or fast-paced as if they were trying to get as much air in as they could before something bad happened again. The person’s heart rate also tends to increase, sometimes up into the range of 180-200 beats per minute which would correspond with someone running at full speed on foot. In contrast, a person’s normal resting heart rate is usually around 60-100 beats per minute. Most people also feel intense fear or a sense of doom during a panic attack.

A panic attack can last anywhere from a few minutes to over an hour, and for some people, the effects can be so debilitating that they avoid any situation in which they might have a panic attack. This avoidance behavior can then lead to the development of Panic Disorder, which is defined as when someone experiences recurrent panic attacks and begins to avoid anyplace or activity where they have had a panic attack in the past.

Causes:

A person holding a sign

There is no single cause of panic attacks and Panic Disorder. Rather, it is thought that many factors may contribute to their development. Some of the possible causes include genetics, environment, personality, and history of abuse or trauma. Additionally, panic attacks and Panic Disorders may be more likely to occur in people who have certain physical or psychological vulnerabilities. For example, if you have a family history of anxiety disorders, you are more likely to develop an anxiety disorder yourself. Additionally, if you have experienced a traumatic event in your past, you may be at increased risk for developing Panic Disorder.

Risk Factors:

Many risk factors may increase your chance of developing panic attacks or Panic Disorder. These include genetics, environment, personality, and history of abuse or trauma. Additionally, people who have certain physical or psychological vulnerabilities may be at increased risk for developing panic attacks or Panic Disorder.

For example, if you have a family history of anxiety disorders, you are more likely to develop an anxiety disorder yourself. Additionally, if you have experienced a traumatic event in your past, you may be at increased risk for developing Panic Disorder. If you think you may be at risk for developing panic attacks or Panic Disorder, it is important to speak with your doctor.

Diagnosis:

If you think you may be experiencing panic attacks, it is important to speak with your doctor. Your doctor will ask you about your symptoms and perform a physical exam. Additionally, your doctor may order some tests to rule out other conditions that could be causing your symptoms.

Once your doctor has ruled out other possible causes for your symptoms, they may diagnose you with panic attacks or Panic Disorder. To diagnose Panic Disorder, a person must experience recurrent panic attacks and begin to avoid anyplace or activity where they have had a panic attack in the past.

If you are diagnosed with panic attacks or Panic Disorder, it is important to remember that there are effective treatments available. With treatment, people can often learn to control their panic attacks and live relatively normal lives.

Treatment:

If you think you may be experiencing panic attacks or Panic Disorder, it is important to speak with your doctor. There are many effective treatments available for both, and with treatment, people can often learn to control their panic attacks and live relatively normal lives.

Treatment for panic attacks and Panic Disorder typically includes some form of psychotherapy, such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), and/or medication. CBT is a type of therapy that helps people to understand the thoughts and feelings that contribute to their panic attacks and teaches them coping skills to deal with their anxiety. Medication options for panic attacks and Panic Disorder include antidepressants, anti-anxiety medications, and sometimes beta-blockers (which are heart medications). It is important to work with your doctor to figure out which treatment option is best for you.

Panic Disorder can be a very frightening condition, but it is important to remember that there are effective treatments available. If you think you may be experiencing panic attacks or Panic Disorder, please speak with your doctor. Together, you can work out a treatment plan that will help you to control your panic attacks and lead a normal life.

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